The Duplessis Era

Published: 2021-06-29 07:04:44
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Category: History Other

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1. The Duplessis era is often referred as "The Great Darkness" and I would totally agree. The Duplessis Era was between 1936-1939 and 1944-1959, at that time Quebec was controlled by Premier Maurice Duplessis and his party, the Union Nationale. Duplessis was a strong Quebec nationalist, and he had devoted to the idea of Quebec as a distinctive society, a "nation" rather than just another Canadian province.
He introduced a new flag for Quebec bearing the French symbol, the fleur-de-lys. Under Duplessis, the Roman Catholic Church was the main defender of Quebec culture. Priests urged people in Quebec to turn their backs on the materialism of English-speaking North America. The Church praised the old Quebec traditions of farm, faith, and family. It ran Quebec's hospital and school where most children only receive basic education. Little would attend high school or university to receive a fine education. As a result, Quebec produced many priests, lawyers and politicians but few scientist, engineers, or business people.
Duplessis tried to keep out influences of foreign culture; he'd encouraged foreign investments from Ontario and the US.
The province government guaranteed cheap labor, since union activity was discouraged or banned. It also promised low taxes. Quebec would benefit from the new investment, but so would Duplessis. In return for favorable business conditions, companies were expected to contribute generously to the Union Nationale.

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